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Scribble Artist Interview with Guy Laramée!

Pétra (2007). Eroded encyclopedias, pigment, 12 x 11.25 x 8.5 in.

Pétra (2007). Eroded encyclopedias, pigment, 12 x 11.25 x 8.5 in.

Scribble Town (ST): We are constantly traveling on a journey.  It’s amazing how each part seems like a whole world of it’s own with all it’s intricacies and surprises. From books, to words, to feelings, all these experiences connect us, either to each other or to our surroundings.  That’s how I felt when I saw Guy Laramée’s work.  I found myself walking through his artworks, which are fantastical microcosms in the grand scheme of things.

Due to it’s uniqueness, I would rather not attempt to classify your art, but how would you describe it?

Guy Laramée (GL): People define me socially as an artist. I make art.

ST: What are you up to at the moment?

GL: Right now I’m doing exactly this : beginning what looks as an “Atlas of No-Mind”.

ST: Wow, I can’t even begin to imagine just how overflowing with indescribable findings this atlas will be!

Your artwork is very full, complex and interdisciplinary in a playful and magical way!  How do you combine music and art?  And what about words and art?  For example, your poem titled Rain has many oil paintings related to the text.  What came first?

Pour Calame (2010) Oil on canvas 102 X 147 cm

Pour Calame (2010). Oil on canvas 102 X 147 cm


GL:
I don’t combine music and visual art. They were different moments of my life. Maybe I’m more multi-disciplinary than interdisciplinary.

I have a love-hate relationship with words, that’s why I both love and destroy books. I find that words are beautiful, they open up entire worlds, but at the same time they fix things in a way that binds us.

Rain (pluie in French) came as a body of work first. But while I was doing the research and starting the actual paintings, I collected poems and texts to understand my feelings about rain, how rain is profoundly nostalgic, calming and beautiful. To translate these feelings on a more existential level, I wrote the poem.


RAIN

May it rain
May it rain on this troubled world
May this rain erase borders
May it mix colors, forms, and times.
May it rain upon me
May the sound of this rain
Wash myself from myself
May this rain dissolve me
Until I recognize myself in trees, mountains, and people.
May I keep hearing this rain
Through the clamour of ambitions.
May it rain
May it rain upon our confused minds
And (that) through this rain
May we return home.

-Guy Laramée, March 2010


ST:
 It’s a beautiful poem!  It lends itself to giving the reader images in their minds and context for your paintings. How have your studies in anthropology inspired your artwork?  What has been you artistic path?  I can see your interests run deep and wide with the range of mediums and concepts you use.

GL: Anthropology came as a way for me to understand that there exist different worldviews and that in their own world, they are all equally valid. They clash one with another, but all worldviews have some fascinating coherence. Thus my problem was/is : if truth – by definition – is unique, if truth can be equated to Oneness, then how come it manifests itself under so many guises, in so many forms? How can Truth encompass contradictions?

The variety of mediums I used only reflect the incapacity of each medium, of each piece, of each work to say it all. The incompletude (uncompletedness ?) of each art work keeps me on the move.

Tuyos, Microtonal and Gestural Music for Invented instruments, 1986-92.

Tuyos, Microtonal and Gestural Music for Invented instruments, 1986-92.


ST:
 The way you manipulate and use books as sculpture is amazing!  How did you start carving books?  Please let us know more about Les Livres-Lumier.  I would love to visit those mountain tops one day!

GL: I cannot really say how I’m doing it because I feel more and more that it is not me who is doing this. When I enter the process (often reluctantly…!) I am possessed by a force that is quite powerful and that “decides” so to speak how things are going to go this time, what tools will be used, etc. Tools and processes change all the time, sometime new tools have to be created. The only thing I know for sure is : since I invent tools, I’m not a monkey, thus I must be human (lol). Even that I don’t really know for sure. I’d rather see the artistic process as a process of Unknowing rather than a learning process.

DRAGON OVER THE CLOUDS. 2014.  Webster dictionary, inks,  pigments, Plexiglass, wood, LEDs.  18 x 21 x 16 (h) inches.  (47.7 x 53.3 x 40.6 cm)

Dragon Over the Clouds (2014). Webster dictionary, inks, pigments, Plexiglass, wood, LEDs.
18 x 21 x 16 (h) inches. (47.7 x 53.3 x 40.6 cm)


ST:
 Your work ranges from 2D to 3D.  Do you feel that some of your 3D works could also work at 2 dimensional pieces?  How do you decide what mediums and platforms to best portray your ideas?

GL: Once I showed an art magazine to a friend who happens to be a photographer. There was a piece in there that was quite ambiguous, like a painting stretched on a sculpture. I asked him ” “What do you think, is this a painting or a sculpture ?” I went for the sculpture. I shouted at him, laughing : “It’s neither ! It’s a photograph !!”

Think about it : 99 % of the art works you saw in your life, you know then only through photographs. Interesting, right ? So in a way you could say that the ‘essence’ of the work can make it into a translation, either photographical or textual; or you could say that for you, the real work is the photograph. If you were to be true to yourself, the work for you is a photo.

So of course my 3D work works very well in 2D, people buy it after seeing it on the internet…!

Guan Yin. Wood, linen, rags, integrated lighting. 16 x 16 x 13 feet ( 5 x 5 x 4 meter). 2011.

Guan Yin (2011). Wood, linen, rags, integrated lighting. 16 x 16 x 13 feet ( 5 x 5 x 4 meter).


ST:
 You’re absolutely right!  The transformations between mediums and documentations of those changes creates a whole new piece of it’s own every time.

When you come up with an idea what is usually your process for working it through?

GL: If I had found a recipe to make my work, I would SELL IT ! There’s no recipe. Like in love. The moment you fix it, it’s gone. That’s the beauty of it, that’s why also I’m always in a state of profound anxiety (half kidding : it is not easy to make insecurity your home…).

ST: Did anybody encourage your creativity when you were a child?

GL: Nobody encouraged me really. My parents gave me the usual painting boxes and tools, but when they saw that it was becoming serious, they did their very best to discourage me. I wish they had succeeded, really, because see in what mess I’m in now : don’t know where the next $$ are going to come from, don’t know what I’m going to do this morning, don’t know how I will ever come out of that terrible state of solitude that I ended up closing myself in, etc etc. Creativity is not a choice and thus it cannot even be fostered. Creativity is an imperative. It is the imperative of life itself. We chose nothing. We follow the current of life or resist it. Even to think that we decide to follow or resist is fallacious. The current of life is all there is.

ST: Guy, what would be some artful advice for our Scribble readers?

GL: Don’t fear solitude. That’s the only advice I can give. When you are alone, don’t try to escape it. Drop your cell phone in a pond. Put your TV to the trash bin. Stop losing your time on computer screens. These things suck your creativity.

Be alone as much as you can. Then the voices of the muses will take care of the rest. They will guide you.

ST: I understand what you mean. We are, in the end, our own best friend even though sometimes it can seem like we are our own enemy!  Thank you so much for sharing with us!  You have given us all whole lot to chew on- from concepts to techniques.  Scribblers, for more inspiration please have a look at Guy’s website at http://www.guylaramee.com.

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Scribble Artist Interview with Steven van Hasten!

securedownload-1Scribble Town (ST): Let’s go to the jungle! Let’s go help our Hippo friend brush his teeth!  Steven van Hasten has a painterly touch for his illustrations that sweep you away to imaginary places.

Steven, what are you up to at the moment?

Steven van Hasten (SVH): I am a Belgian artist who grew up in Courtrai, a small commercial town in West Flanders. I am huge comic book fan and have a large collection. I never go to sleep before reading a comic book.  I am doing some different projects now, commissioned and personal projects… One of the commissioned ones is an illustration for an adoption card, very pleasant to do. I am also doing a children’s book based on a script of my wife …

ST: I’m sure you and your wife are inspirations for each other! Your illustrations are wonderful! Where do you come up with your ideas for your illustrations?

SVH: When I start a new illustration, I always first go for a walk. While just thinking about anything, ideas start to come. Almost everything I encounter on a walk can lead to an idea, a picture on a wall, something lying on the street, something that happens on my way, a strange house … But the greatest source of inspiration are the people I meet and see in the streets… Everyone can be the next person in my illustration :).

ST: In that sense, everybody is magical. I believe that! And can see that in your illustrations.

I noticed on your website that you have many different styles that you work with. What is one of your favorite technique and why?

SVH: I make digital and painted illustrations, but I prefer the classic way of drawing and painting a lot more, because I like the smell of acrylics and holding a pencil feels much more comfortable then moving a mouse. Sitting at the table with a paper in front of me gives a much more relaxed feeling then sitting before a computer.

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ST: I think the tactile process shows in your artwork too. As a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up?  What has been your path to becoming an illustrator?

SVH: As soon as I was old enough to hold a pencil, I knew I would do something with drawing. As a child I drew on every surface in the house: walls, tables, etc.. My parents were very happy when I was old enough to go to the local academy and start to draw on regular paper instead. One of first things I can remember is a comic book about a knight I made when I was the age of 10. When I was older I completed a Masters from St. Lucas, School of Arts in Ghent, Belgium where I studied Graphic Design and Illustration. That was the start of my career as an illustrator.

ST: Have you ever been interested in creating a TV show series of your own?  What is your favorite cartoon on TV?

securedownload-3SVH: I never considered it. I think my style is to complex for a tv-show, it would cost to much time to make a show or I should have people helping me and I rather work alone like I am doing now.

I don’t watch much television, I am more of a reader, so I don’t know much about the cartoons that are on television right now. As a kid I liked ‘Tom and Jerry’ and I still like ‘The Simpsons’ … And animation like ‘Despicable me’, ‘Spirited away’, ‘Persepolis’, ‘Rango’.

ST: I see you have a variety of themes in your illustrations.  What is a theme you are currently working on?  What is the Tekeningen series about?

SVH: The theme comes back, most of the time, in my illustrations to people. I love to draw people with all the strange habits they have, how they dress, behave, how they act funny. You could say that the human behaviour is my most popular theme. I do love drawing animals too, but even the animals always have a human touch, the act like humans, not like animals would do…

The ‘tekeningen’ series are live-drawings. Every week I hire a model for making quick sketches. This is important to evolve and try different things. These drawings are exercises in technique, motion, colour, line. I make hundreds of them, most of them arrive in the wastepaper basket. In a 2 hour drawing session I make 20-30 sketches. A sketch doesn’t take more than 5 minutes, so I can’t get lost in drawing details, it has to be basic and direct. If I have one drawing at the end of the evening I find good, then my evening was successful.

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ST: Those sessions are also great to just get movement within your drawing and lose yourself in the motion. When you are not drawing or creating, what do you like to do?

SVH: Being in nature is the thing I do most when I am not illustrating. It gives me the peace I need to keep me going with fresh ideas. I like hiking, especially in the Scottish Highlands, where I go at least 1 or 2 times a year. Or walking in nature closer to home.

 I also love to read books (mostly fantasy) or comic books, which I do almost every evening after drawing. Otherwise I would be thinking all night on my illustrations. It’s like making my head empty. 

And riding my motorbike is a favourite too…

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ST: You have some exhibitions coming up.  Please let us know about them.  What artworks will you be exhibiting?

SVH: Next week I have an exhibition in London on the Parallax Art Fair. I will show some artworks I recently made for a memory-game and for a puzzle-game.

In April there is an upcoming exhibition with some other illustrator. The brief was to make an illustration about the pencil in the art world. There will be shown only one illustration.
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ST: You surely are busy! Which artists inspire you to create?

SVH: Heronimus Bosch, a Dutch painter from the 15th century, has always been a great inspiration. He must have been a little insane, I guess, because he drew very strange things :). And illustrators like Shaun Tan and Rebecca Dautremer, because they are very passionate. And also Jean-Michel Basquiat, who died too young..

ST: You are an inspiration for us! Any tips for our Scribblers?

SVH: If you have a dream follow it, no matter what it costs. Working hard and practicing everyday is much more important then talent. Of course you need a little talent but in the end it is who works hard that will be the winner. Keep your eyes open, ideas and creativity are everywhere, you just have to see it. The most important thing I learned at art school, is not how to draw, but how to look to the world, with an open mind.

ST: And with an open mind we continue our day! Thank you, Steven for sharing with us :). Scribblers, please have a look at Steven’s website to see more of his artwork and learn more about him.

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Scribble Artist Interview with Bill Lawrence!

Scribble Town (ST): Bill Lawrence is a poet set out to write his first children’s book. His writing is earnest and the illustrations portray that sensitivity and playfulness.  Let’s learn more about Bill!

DSC_0207.mediumBill Lawrence (BL): First, thank you for your interest in my writing.  It is humbling to be asked to share what I’m doing and I’m honored to be a part of Scribble Blog.  I’m an inspirational writer, meaning I can’t just sit down and write whenever I have the time to do so.  Something has to trigger my creativity and that isn’t always convenient.  But when the thoughts come in it is fun.   I’m a dedicated husband and father to great kids who turn out to be the inspiration for much of my poetry.  Watching them go through the triumphs and foibles of life give me the third person perspective that rings throughout a lot of what I write.  Writing is also a way to bond with my kids as I’ve written some pretty cool stuff this way.  It shows them that writing isn’t as daunting as they may have believed and it really opens a window into what they think and feel.  It sometimes replaces the question, “what’s going on with you and your life, what are you thinking about most?”  It all tends to come out when you allow them to express themselves in art…and they’re proud of it, too.  Currently I am mid way through a series of children’s books but I’m also writing a science fiction novel and have other poems that will hopefully end up illustrated, as well.  I’m also a guitar player and have penned a few songs that I hope to record in the next year or so.  Writing and music are themes that run strong through my life.

ST: Bill, where are you located and what are you up to these days?

BL: I live in Denver with my wonderful wife and family.  I’ve enjoyed great support from them as I’ve set out to publish my first book.

ST: Congratulations on reaching your Kickstarter goal!  I’m sure you are so excited and WE are doubly happy to be able to soon read your story.  Scribblers, have a look here to read more about ‘Odie and Snowflake’. https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1187805553/a-childrens-book-illustrated-to-poetry-by-bill-law?ref=nav_search
Snowflakes08-2ST: What is ‘Odie and Snowflake’ about or is this a surprise?  I like the idea that it’s a series because then we’ll get more involved with the characters and story.

BL: ‘Odie and Snowflake’ is my first book and it is set in a winter scape.  The books will be set to my poetry with illustrations that follow along.  Each poem/book will revolve around a season (summer, spring, winter and fall) thematically and I’m having a lot of fun with them.  Hidden in the art is a purpose, however.  Exposing young listeners and readers to a higher level of grammar, diction and meter provides a stark contrast to the more simple kid’s books we know and love.   These simpler books definitely have their place but so do those that raise the bar on thought and expression through art.  I believe that kids gain from stretching and exposing their vocabulary to interesting grammatical tools like consonance, assonance, alliteration, etc…  The timing and rhythm of a person’s speech is affected at an early age by what literature is exposed to them and hopefully people see in my books an interesting alternative to what they may see out there.

ST: What inspired the story?  When did you write it?

BL: Watching my son play with his cousin in the snow last winter inspired this poem/book.  Their interactions and expressions of joy brought up my memories and thoughts of winters as a kid growing up in the mid-Atlantic area.  It was a purely analog time in my life reliant on imagination and the friendships developed along the way.  Those memories matched with my adult perspective have provided a vehicle to relay my creativity through poetry.

ShelSilverstein_UnionforChildrensRi

ST: How did you come up with the characters and illustrations?

BL: I’m not the most skilled illustrator so I asked an artist to help me create the scenes for the book and they came out terrific.  I can’t wait to crack open that first printing and see it on the page!

ST: What is your personal connection to poetry?

BL: My path to writing purposefully took a turn in earnest about 16 years ago.  I wrote poems that helped me deal with the joys and lows in life and found it cathartic.  It’s great therapy for me as it provides an outlet for my thoughts.

Portait of Shel Silverstein

Photograph of Shel Silverstein

ST: What was your favorite book as a child?

BL: I had several memorable book exposures as a kid.  Goodnight Moon, many Shel Silverstein stories, and the Tolkien series Lord of the Rings, with many in between, of course.  These stories stretched my imagination but more importantly provided the glue for my bond with the most important people in my life… Mom and Dad.  My parents read to me as a child and that was an important factor in my reading and writing success later in life.  It is so important to read to your kids, even the books they insist on hearing after you’ve read them over 100 times.

ST: Any last tips on creativity? Can you give any advice on how one can express themselves or develop their ideas?

BL: Don’t be surprised if it takes you until your 30’s/40’s or later to “hear” your voice.  But feel fortunate when you do and then take advantage by putting your words and thoughts to the page.  Don’t worry about being perfect or trying to reach all audiences.  It may be that your only listener is you, but that’s highly unlikely.  In staying true to your word, you will have the greatest lasting satisfaction with yourself and others will respect your genuine expressions.  Here is the poem upon which my book is based…

Ode to a Snow Flake

Nature’s perfection
This I know
A freshly fallen
Flake of snow

Nothing in nature
Can compare
To this uniquely constructed
Defier of air

As cold settles in
For seeming an age
This symmetry of nature
Takes centerstage

While under assemblage
And hid from the sun
It falls for a mile
To land on your tongue

Stellar in appearance
Defying winter’s shroud
Can this beauty really come
From so sullen a cloud?

Light as a feather
A contradiction of sorts
Put two together
A maker of forts!

Viewed through a window
It lasts but a minute
So knee-deep is the way
To find yourself in it!

Singular in aspect
Yet countless they seem
Both magic and mystic
The glint and the gleam

Take a moment to study
And you’ll notice in time
Simple plates and prisms
Graupel and Rime

Double plates and dendrites
Capped columns and bars
They’re proudest of the 12 branch
And fancy themselves stars

Winter can last
For an age, it seems
A perfect time
for snowbound dreams

Goodnight Moon is an American children's picture book written by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Clement Hurd.

Goodnight Moon is an American children’s picture book written by Margaret Wise Brown and illustrated by Clement Hurd.

ST: Thank you, Bill for your words of inspiration!  I feel that there is always so much to look forward to. We look forward to reading your book before turning the lights out for a good night’s sleep.

The Lord of the Rings

The Lord of the Rings

Posted by Andi Thea, on November 16th, 2014 at 3:10 am. 1 Comment

Category: adults,Books,Illustration,kids,Scribble Artist Interviews Labels: , , , , , ,


Happy 110th Birthday Dr. Seuss!

Geisel aka Dr. Seuss in 1957, holding The Cat in the Hat, which inaugurated his Beginner Books

Geisel aka Dr. Seuss in 1957, holding The Cat in the Hat, which inaugurated his Beginner Books

The idea of stepping into the doctor’s office, for some, was a nightmare that has come to life. There was only one “doctor” that children and even adults were happy to welcome into our lives. That’s Dr. Seuss!  March 2nd commemorates the 110th birthday of Dr. Seuss. While he passed away in 1991 at the age of 87, his stories and illustrations still live on in our hearts and lives.

Dr. Seuss (born Theodor Seuss Geisel) was born March 2, 1904 in Springfield, Massachusetts. During his lifetime, Seuss wrote 46 childrens books; including some of his most famous bestsellers, Green Eggs and Ham, The Cat in the Hat, The Lorax, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and my childhood favorite, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish. Seuss was also the illustrator for all of the books in his collection. In the beginning of his career he used pencil and watercolor, but as time went on he migrated towards pen and ink (usually black and white), and few colors. He began adding more colors to his books by the end of his career. Many of his children’s books have even been adapted into animated and even live action screenplays.

During his lifetime, Seuss won numerous awards; including two Academy awards, two Emmy awards, a Peabody award, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the Pulitzer Prize. He also has his own star on Hollywood Boulevard on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Seuss’ birthday is commemorated every year by “Read Across America Day”, which falls on the closest school day to Seuss’ Birthday, March 2. This year “Read Across America Day” is on March 3.  Let’s go to the library and check out all of Dr. Seuss’ books. You can also visit Seussville.  Enjoy!

Dr Seuss quote Thing 1 and Thing 2

Dr. Seuss quote Thing 1 and Thing 2 from the book, I Can Read With My Eyes Shut.

Posted by Andi Thea, on March 1st, 2014 at 6:54 am. No Comments

Category: adults,Books,Scribble Picks,Uncategorized Labels: , , , ,


Scribble Artist Interview with Timothy Young!

Scribble Town (ST): With us on the Scribble Blog is Timothy Young! Timothy has a long, creative career as an illustrator, graphic designer, toy designer, animator, puppet builder and sculptor and continues to surprise us with his imagination.

Timothy Young with Barney!

Timothy Young with Barney!

Timothy Young (TY): Hi! I live in Maryland with my family on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay. My first book, I’m Looking For A Monster!, came out in 2008 and my 4th book, I Hate Picture Books!, has just come out from Schiffer Publishing.

ST: Where are you and what are you up to these days? I’m sure very excited about your book ‘I Hate Picture Books!’ reaching people everywhere! Please tell us a bit about your book. A little sneak peak please 🙂

TY: I Hate Picture Books! is about a boy named Max who is having a bit of a temper tantrum and is throwing away his picture books. Throughout the book Max describes how picture books have gotten him in trouble and all the while we see him either pictured in these books or showing what he is describing in the style of many classic children’s books that the reader will recognize. I really enjoyed poking fun at many of the books I have loved through the years.

I Hate Picture Books by Timothy Young

I Hate Picture Books by Timothy Young

ST: Throughout your years of experience have you found a favorite place to write and draw?

TY: I have a home office where I do most of my drawing. I write in many places, including when I’m mowing the lawn or driving in my car. That is, I think up a lot of ideas and write them down later on.

ST: I think writing while mowing the lawn is it’s own art form! What other kinds of art do you practice?

TY: I have done a lot of different types of art. I draw, I sculpt, I use the computer to design graphics and advertising. I use Photoshop to finish most of my illustrations.

A few character designs by Timothy Young

A few character designs by Timothy Young

I design toys and I have a new toy line coming out soon called HEDZZ™. I designed them and sculpted the prototypes. I’ll let you know more soon about where to get them. You can see more of my artwork at http://www.creaturesandcharacters.com.

ST: All of your characters whether they are in books or in the shape of a toy have such different personalities. What do you hope to communicate with your stories?

Timothy Young's Books

Timothy Young's Books

TY: I don’t start out with any specific message, I usually think of a character and a situation they find themselves in. If some kind of lesson sneaks in there, that’s a plus. Mostly I write books for myself and I hope other people like them too.

ST:What was your favorite storybook growing up? Or is there a character that you connected with especially?

Max Eating Green Ham by Timothy Young

Max Eating Green Ham by Timothy Young

TY: I loved Dr Seuss and P. D. Eastman’s books along with many others. Two of my favorites are no longer in print. I especially liked The Ice-Cream Cone Coot by Arnold Lobel and GWOT! Horribly Funny Hairticklers by Steven Kellogg.

ST: I can see your love for Dr. Seuss in your picture of Max eating green ham (look to your right). Dr. Seuss would have loved that! Your designs and inventions inspire us to go to adventure lands! Where do you get your inspiration from?

TY: Everywhere! I can’t stop these characters and ideas from running around in my brain.

Often times I just doodle things until they become a creature or a character who’s story needs to be told. These days I like drawing on really cheap tracing pads I buy at the supermarket. The paper is rough and I like the line quality I get with my drawing pencils. My favorite pencils are Creatacolor Nero extra soft #1s. Once I have a sketch I like I take another piece of paper and trace over my first to get cleaner lines. Then I scan it into my MacBook Pro and do all of my color work in Photoshop.

I wanted to let everyone know about my contest. If you can name 40 books of the over 250 that are referred to in I Hate Picture Books!, you can enter to win over a dozen autographed books by authors whose books are in my book. You can find all of the details at http://www.ihatepicturebooks.com/contest.html.

ST: Thanks Tim for the challenge! I’m up for it. On your mark, get set, go!

The cover of I Hate Picture Books by Timothy Young

The cover of I Hate Picture Books by Timothy Young


A Scribble Town GIVE AWAY for Back to School Week!

Hi Scribblers,

It’s Back to School Week! I hope you have been having fun with the crafts so far this week.

To make Back to School Week even MORE exciting- we’re doing a GIVE AWAY!!

We will give a copy of the book Now I Know my ABC’s to the first 3 people to post their (or their children’s) finished scribble on our Scribble Town Facebook page or send us a picture of their finished scribble via email!

A Scribble Town GIVE AWAY!!!

Now I Know My ABC’s is a Scribble Book by Scribble mats! Each book comes 6 crayons and the inside pages are black-and-white. They’re made of a special material so that you can Color On the pages with your little ones and then Wipe Off to use the book again and again for more scribbley fun learning!

Not only will the first 3 people receive a free copy of Now I Know My ABC’s, your scribble (finished art) will also be featured here on Scribble Blog and on our Facebook page.

***Sorry, at the moment this Give Away is open to US residents only.***
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